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Normative Issues in Global Environmental Governance: Connecting Climate Change, Water and Forests

Abstract: 
This article discusses the economic and social consequences of sustainable development and climate change-conscious governance. Discussing "glocal rich-poor normative issues, and normative issues in relation to the process of negotiation between countries and actors," the paper addresses the contributions of industrialized and developing countries to current greenhouse gas emissions and their roles in current governance for sustainable development. Mention is made of the many attempts to create an international system of environmental accountability at conferences such as the UN's Convention on Climate Change (1992), and with international policy such as the Kyoto Protocol (1979). The paper points out the conflict of interest between industrialized and developing nations when discussion of precautionary principle, the "polluter pays" principle, and other methods of accountability creates gridlock and disagreement. The paper then addresses these concerns within the scope of the water and deforestation crises, addressing the normative concerns and international attempts at governance and pointing out the "strong normative and architectural inconsistencies" related to governance and attempts at sustainable development in these fields.
Author: 
Joyeeta Gupta
Institution: 
Environment and Development in the Global South, Department of Geography, Planning and International Development Studies, Amsterdam Institute for Social Science Research, University of Amsterdam
Year: 
2014
Input By: 
Henry Lubowe
Affiliation: 
MIT
Region(s): 
Industry Focus: 
Food & Agriculture
Datatype(s): 
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Theory/Definition