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The National Military Strategy of the United States of America

Abstract: 
Provides the ways the US military will advance national interests including broader peace, security, and prosperity by accomplishing defense objectives and redefining leadership to adapt to a challenging era through three major themes: supporting national efforts to address complex security challenges, deepening security relationships with allies, and preparing for a dynamic and uncertain future which will require a full spectrum of military capabilities and attributes. US’ civilian-led foreign policy will focus on diplomacy, development, and defense through a spectrum of direct and indirect leadership approaches (facilitator, enabler, convener, and guarantor). Argues that a changing distribution of global power will evolve to a “multi-nodal” world with a growing number of state and non-state actors and more interest-driven, shifting coalitions based on diplomatic, military, and economic power rather than opposing blocs based on security competition. Demographic trends predict the world will become more urbanized and populated. Global climate change may challenge the ability of developing states to respond to natural disasters. Predicts the US will remain the foremost economic and military power, though its national debt is a vulnerability. Sees states in Asia such as China as economic competitors with high growth potential. Reviews the challenges of weapons of mass destruction, access to global commons and globally connected domains, and characteristics of non-state actors. National interests are: security of US, citizens, and allies; a strong and innovative US economy; respect for universal values at home and abroad; and an international order advanced by US leadership promoting peace, security, and opportunity. Military objectives are: counter violent extremism; deter and defeat aggression; strengthen international and regional security; and shape the future force.
Author: 
United States Department of Defense
Institution: 
United States Department of Defense
Year: 
2015
Input By: 
Jessica Choi
Affiliation: 
MIT
Country: 
United States
Datatype(s): 
Bibliographies & Reports
Policies