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Assessing Western perspectives on Chinese Intelligence

Abstract: 
Presents a summary of the conventional view by Western analysts on Chinese espionage; points to flaws on such views. Argues that Chinese intelligence methods are in fact similar to those of Western powers; such as recruiting foreign intelligence agents, e.g. by using coercion or extortion, or deploying professional Chinese agents. Shows a series of events (case studies) related to Chinese intelligence and espionage. Analyzes the difference between purely economic espionage by non-state Chinese actors and Beijing-supported espionage pursuing policy goals; the former is considered less structured and wider in scope, such as “thousand grains of sand” or “vacuum-cleaner” (getting as much information as possible, even though each data point by itself could seem menial), while the latter has a more narrow scope and is more oriented toward supporting the Chinese Communist Party’s goals. Includes a historical perspective of the intelligence services in China with political and international context (White Terror, Chinese Communist Party or CCP, Kuomitang or KMT, the Chinese civil war). Provides an overview and examples of methods used by China for collecting intelligence.
Author: 
Peter L. Mattis
Institution: 
International Journal of Intelligence and Counterintelligence
Year: 
2012
Input By: 
Alexander Gamero-Garrido
Affiliation: 
MIT
Industry Focus: 
Electronics
Information & Telecommunication
Internet & Cyberspace
Other Services
Country: 
China, Taiwan, United States
Datatype(s): 
Bibliographies & Reports
Case Studies
Events
Policies
Organizations